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South Africa

Officially the Republic of South Africa, is the southernmost sovereign state in Africa. It is bounded on the south by 2,798 kilometers of coastline of Southern Africa stretching along the South Atlantic and Indian Oceans, on the north by the neighbouring countries of Namibia, Botswana and Zimbabwe, and on the east by Mozambique and Swaziland, and surrounding the kingdom of Lesotho. South Africa is the 25th-largest country in the world by land area, and with close to 53 million people, is the world's 24th-most populous nation.
Pretoria is one of the country's three capital cities, serving as the seat of the executive branch of government. Cape Town is the legislative capital and Bloemfontein the judicial capital.

Universities

Cape Peninsula University of Technology logo

Cape Peninsula University of Technology

The Cape Peninsula University of Technology was established on 1 January 2005, when the Cape Technikon and Peninsula Technikon merged. This merger was part of a national transformation process that transformed the higher education landscape in South Africa.

Today, this institution is the only university of technology in the Western Cape and is the largest university in the region, boasting more than 30 000 students, several campuses and service points and more than 70 programmes.

However, the institution has humble beginnings in the Cape Technikon and Peninsula Technikon, which dates back to the early 1900's

Universidad de Stellenbosch logo

Universidad de Stellenbosch

The history of Stellenbosch University (SU) dates as far back as the 17th century, when regular school education was initiated in the town of Stellenbosch in 1685. With the start of the Theological Seminary of the Dutch Reformed Church in 1859, higher education became established in the town. In December 1863, the foundation was laid for the establishment of the Stellenbosch Gymnasium, which became a reality in 1866. 

University of Cape Town logo

University of Cape Town

The University of Cape Town was founded in 1829 as the South African College, a high school for boys.

The College had a small tertiary-education facility that grew substantially after 1880, when the discovery of gold and diamonds in the north - and the resulting demand for skills in mining - gave it the financial boost it needed to grow.

The College developed into a fully fledged university during the period 1880 to 1900, thanks to increased funding from private sources and the government.

During these years, the College built its first dedicated science laboratories, and started the departments of mineralogy and geology to meet the need for skilled personnel in the country's emerging diamond and gold-mining industries.

Another key development during this period was the admission of women. In 1886 the Professor of Chemistry, Paul Daniel Hahn, convinced the Council to admit four women into his chemistry class on a trial basis. Owing to the exceptional standard of work by the women students, the College decided to admit women students permanently in honour of Queen Victoria's Diamond Jubilee in 1887.

University of Kwazulu Natal logo

University of Kwazulu Natal

The University of KwaZulu-Natal was formed on 1 January 2004 as a result of the merger between the University of Durban-Westville and the University of Natal. The new university brings together the rich histories of both the former Universities.

The University of Durban-Westville was established in the 1960s as the University College for Indians on Salisbury Island in Durban Bay. Student numbers throughout the 1960s were low as a result of the Congress Alliances' policy of shunning apartheid structures. This policy gave way in the 1980s to a strategy of "education under protest" which sought to transform apartheid institutions into sites of struggle. Student numbers grew rapidly and in 1971, the College was granted University status. The following year, the newly-named University of Durban-Westville moved into its modern campus in Westville and was a site of major anti-apartheid struggle. UDW became an autonomous institution in 1984, opening up to students of all races.

University of Pretoria logo

University of Pretoria

The University of Pretoria has its origins in the establishment of the Pretoria Centre of the Transvaal University College in 1908. The colloquial name of the university, Tuks or Tukkies, was derived from the acronym of the college - TUC.

The college opened its doors as an English language institution housed in Kya Rosa, a four-bedroom residential property in the centre of Pretoria. TUC started off with four professors and three lecturers and 32 enrolled students. Courses were presented in Dutch and other Modern Languages, English Language and Literature, Classics (which included Philosophy, Latin and Hebrew), as well as Natural Sciences.

University of the Western Cape logo

University of the Western Cape

​The University of the Western Cape has a history of creative struggle against oppression, discrimination and disadvantage. Among academic institutions it has been in the vanguard of South Africa's historic change, playing a distinctive academic role in helping to build an equitable and dynamic nation. UWC's key concerns with access, equity and quality in higher education arise from extensive practical engagement in helping the historically marginalised participate fully in the life of the nation.